HomeNewsArticle Display

42nd COS: Reserve’s newest cyber mission team

Col. Anthony M. Perkins, 960th Cyberspace Operations Group commander, meets with members of the newly activated 42nd Cyberspace Operations Squadron Sept. 12 at Scott Air Force Base, Ill. Lt. Col. Samuel McGlynn, front left, assumed command of the new unit, which has a rich lineage dating back to 1949 when it was first activated at Mitchell Air Force Base, New York, as the 42nd Communications Squadron. Read the full article about the activation and assumption of command ceremony on our website or by clicking here. (U.S. Air Force photo by Maj. Alysia R. Harvey)

Col. Anthony M. Perkins, 960th Cyberspace Operations Group commander, meets with members of the newly activated 42nd Cyberspace Operations Squadron Sept. 12 at Scott Air Force Base, Ill. Lt. Col. Samuel McGlynn, front left, assumed command of the new unit, which has a rich lineage dating back to 1949 when it was first activated at Mitchell Air Force Base, New York, as the 42nd Communications Squadron. Read the full article about the activation and assumption of command ceremony on our website or by clicking here. (U.S. Air Force photo by Maj. Alysia R. Harvey)

Lt. Col. Samuel McGlynn accepts the 42nd Cyberspace Operations Group guidon, assuming command of the squadron, from Col. Anthony M. Perkins, 960th Cyberspace Operations Group, as Chief Master Sgt. Mark Otzenberger, the squadron's new superintendent looks on, during a ceremony in the Ludwig Heritage Hall Atrium at Scott Air Force Base Sept. 12. The 42nd COS has a rich history, dating back to just after World War II when the 42nd Communications Squadron was first activated at Mitchell Air Force Base, New York, Nov. 17, 1949. (U.S. Air Force photo by Maj. Alysia R. Harvey)

Lt. Col. Samuel McGlynn accepts the 42nd Cyberspace Operations Group guidon, assuming command of the squadron, from Col. Anthony M. Perkins, 960th Cyberspace Operations Group, as Chief Master Sgt. Mark Otzenberger, the squadron's new superintendent looks on, during a ceremony in the Ludwig Heritage Hall Atrium at Scott Air Force Base Sept. 12. The 42nd COS has a rich history, dating back to just after World War II when the 42nd Communications Squadron was first activated at Mitchell Air Force Base, New York, Nov. 17, 1949. (U.S. Air Force photo by Maj. Alysia R. Harvey)

Scott Air Force Base, Ill. --

Monday, Sept. 12th, the 42nd Cyberspace Operations Squadron activated at Scott Air Force Base, Ill., just 440 days after the 42nd Combat Communications Squadron was officially inactivated at McGuire Air Force Base, N.J.

It is indeed a great honor to carry on the legacy of the men and women of the 42nd, which now assumes the Cyberspace Protection Team, or CPTs, defensive cyberspace operations mission. 

The following is a high-level overview of the mission, training requirements and summary of opportunities to join the 42nd COS.

As the defensive maneuver element of the United States Cyber Command's Cyberspace Mission Force, the CPTs provide a specialized capability to defend key terrain and prioritized missions against exploitation and cyber attack. To accomplish the mission, Air Force CPT operators employ the  Cyberspace Vulnerability Assessment/Hunter weapon system, which includes a suite of security tools tailored to the defensive cyber operations mission. 

Delivering decisive effects in this contested battlespace requires extensive operator training. Indeed the training pipeline required to meet qualification standards is the longest of any unit in the group, including a   three-month initial qualification training course for cyber operators as well as subsequent mission qualification training.  Additional crew position training and mission qualification is required depending on crew position. Personnel filling intel positions have a separate training track that is tailored to their mission work role.

As one half of a Total Force Association, the 42nd COS is partnered with the Regular Air Force's 835th Cyberspace Operations Squadron to provide the cyber operators for three CPTs under the 24th Air Force Commander's tasking authority.  Unique within the group, 42nd COS members have a standing requirement to fill crew positions that would otherwise be occupied by Regular Air Force members as found on other CPTs. 

During steady-state operations, mission ready Traditional Reservists will support ongoing operations and exercises as well as continue to upgrade their skills to meet future mission requirements.  During contingencies, TRs can be mobilized to provide surge capability, increasing CPT mission capacity.

Currently, members interested in joining the 42nd COS can find most opportunities available in the full-time enlisted Active Guard & Reserve positions, which can be found by clicking the "AGR Enlisted Vacancies" link in the Reserve Management Vacancy System. 

While cross training into an AGR position is normally prohibited, the Air Reserve Personnel Center has opened applications to any Air Force specialty code for cross-training into the 1B4X1 Cyber Warfare Operations career field, as long as the member meets career field entry requirements.

Members interested in AGR positions should review the Air Force Reserve's AGR page on the MyPers website for more detailed guidance on the AGR program. 

Part-time opportunities for cyber and intel positions are expected to start advertising in the coming months as the full time cadre is established.

Those Citizen Airmen interested in TR opportunities are also encouraged to monitor RMVS.